Pennsylvania Winter: People, Places, and Things Juried Exhibition

Kelly Green’s “Winter Pale” was named this exhibition’s Best of Show. 

Pennsylvania Winter: People, Places, and Things is an online juried exhibition that includes artists whose primary residence is in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.  Forty images were chosen by juror Patrick McGrady, the Charles V. Hallman Senior Curator at Penn State’s Palmer Museum of Art. 

Patrick will share some thoughts on his selection process and talk about the award-winning pieces on Friday, November 27 during the Central Pennsylvania Festival of the Arts’ December to Remember virtual event.  Scroll to the bottom of this page to see Patrick’s juror statement.

A total of $1,500 is being awarded in this exhibition.  The exhibition is made possible in part by sponsorships from the State College Framing Company & Gallery, Jennifer and Brad Karch, and the Chamber of Business & Industry of Centre County.  Thank you to our sponsors for their generous support!

Click or tap on the images below to see larger versions. Please consider purchasing art from this exhibition!  Original art makes a unique and special gift.  To purchase any of these works, please contact Jennifer Shuey, Director of Development at (814) 574-6106.

Kathy Boykowycz
Pittsburgh, PA
Hunger Moon
12″ x 16.5″
photocollage
$200

Joyce Danko
Bethlehem, PA
Portrait of an Immigrant
16″ x 20″
oil on Belgian linen panel
$2,400

Dotty Ford
State College, PA
‘The wastes of snow on the hill were ghostly in the moonlight.’ M. H. Lovelace
12″ x 12″ x .75″
collage on wood
$100

Dotty Ford
State College, PA
‘Winter was creeping in and…the day…was dissolving…’ C.J. Tudor
12″ x 12″ x 1.75″
collage on wood
$100

Kelly Green
State College, PA
Winter Pale
10″ x 8″
oil on linen
NFS
First Place – People
Best of Show

Art Heim
State College, PA
Blue Course Winter Sunrise
16″ x 20″
photography
$125

Art Heim
State College, PA
The Nittany Lion Inn Winter
16″ x 20″
photography
$125

Brandon Hirt
Ebensburg, PA
Mail Pouch Snow
24″ x 36″
photography
$350
First Place – Thing

Bernadette Kazmarski
Carnegie, PA
Dramatic Light
16″ x 20″
digital photography
$100

Peggy Klinger
Pennsylvania Furnace, PA
Honorable Retirement
12″ x 24″
oil
$400

Peggy Klinger
Pennsylvania Furnace, PA
Juniata Winter Morning
16″ x 20″
oil
$450
First Place – Place

Cinda Kostyak
State College, PA
Light in the Springhouse
9.5″ x 13.5″
gouache
$375

Cinda Kostyak
State College, PA
Winter Blues
17.5″ x 24″
watercolor
$425

Cinda Kostyak
State College, PA
Cohick Farm in Cumberland County
24″ x 20″
oil on birch
NFS

Candace Kubinec
Greensburg, PA
Flash of Red
16″ x 13″
photography
$80

Candace Kubinec
Greensburg, PA
Light & Shadow
19.5″ x 15.5″
photography
$95

Judith Lauso
Bethel Park, PA
winter barn
20″ x 24″
watercolor on board
$1,000

Judith Lauso
Bethel Park, PA
chick-a-dee
8″ x 10″
watercolor
$1,000

Judith Lauso
Bethel Park, PA
woods and winter thaw
11″ x 14″
watercolor
$1,000

Judith Lauso
Bethel Park, PA
winter holiday children with candles
14″ x 20″
ink and watercolor on board
$800
Second Place – People

Melissa Lohr
Harmony, PA
Twilight
9.5″ x 14″
photography
$100

Melissa Lohr
Harmony, PA
Winter Lake
9.5″ x 14″
photography
$100

Laura Maney
Warriors Mark, PA
White Pine
11″ x 11″
lithograph
NFS

Jeffery Mathison
Centre Hall, PA
Intersection
15″ x 20″
watercolor
$2,400

Valerie Moyer
Beaver Springs, PA
Winters Walk
14″ x 17″
acrylic
$490

Zone Patcher
Conemaugh, PA
Circumstance Apparition Analysis
9200 x 3454
digital image, 3D Fractal Software
$550

Zone Patcher
Conemaugh, PA
Vision and Idea – Perception or Purpose – Structure n Creation
6000 x 3373
digital image, 3D Fractal Software
$440
Second Place – Thing

Pamela J Salokangas
Lemont, PA
The Blues
12″ x 9″
digital photography
$75

Maggie Scotilla
State College, PA
Hare in the moon
9″ x 12″
ink and digital
NFS

Sami Sharkey
Boalsburg, PA
Snow and Ice
16″ x 20″
digital photography
$200

Carolyn Smith
Valencia, PA
Friday Night
22″ x 16″
watercolor
$2,500

Carolyn Smith
Valencia, PA
Penn Avenue
22″ x 16″
watercolor
$2,500

William Sweeney
Garnet Valley, PA
Water Over the Dam
10″ x 18″
pastel
$425

Meaghan Troup
Mifflinburg, PA
The Quiet
24″ x 18″
oil
$800

Mary Vollero
Bellefonte, PA
Around the Bend
11″ x 14″
photography
$137

William Vrscak
Pittsburgh, PA
Seen Better Days
16″ x 20″
watercolor
$700

William Vrscak
Pittsburgh, PA
Winter Alley
20″ x 16″
watercolor
$700

Bruce Wallace
Lock Haven, PA
Fishing Creek in February
12″ x 16″
scanned film photograph
$30
Second Place – Places

Patricia Wilt
Hyndman, PA
Bedford County Robin Snow
16″ x 20″
watercolor
$600

Patricia Wilt
Hyndman, PA
Gladdens Run In A White Gown
16″ x 20″
watercolor
NFS

Juror’s Statement

When judging a work of art, I generally find, as I suspect do most individuals who are similarly charged, that my first reaction is purely intuitive. There’s something immediate, certainly more of a feeling than a rational thought, about the initial encounter with an object that either makes me want to stop and look some more—to dwell, in order to better understand the attraction—or encourages me instead to move on, often without so much as a “how do you do.” The eye is not infallible. To be sure, each of the 133 submissions for Pennsylvania Winter received multiple and prolonged views, and further consideration did elevate a few entries into the exhibition. But not one was demoted from the group formed from the first look.

Lying at the heart of the selection process is evidence of craft: mastery over the chosen medium, comprehension of color theories, knowledge of the machinations that can enliven the picture plane. Success in these areas alone can garner a work’s entry into the exhibition, but ideally we seek another level. Some call it vision, others transcendence, perhaps creativity—whatever it is that lifts art beyond the mere transcription of nature. It can elude description, but much as Justice Potter Stewart wrote when deciding Jacobellis v. Ohio (look it up!), I know it when I see it.

In the portrait aptly titled Winter Pale, this better measure of talent resides not so much in the learned depiction of anatomy as in the blue greens, pale lilacs, and grays that invade the white of the woman’s tunic. I’ve searched in vain for such coloration on every white shirt I own. It doesn’t exist in any real light; it animates the lower portion of the picture here purely for our pleasure. In Juniata Winter Morning, whose author has long observed that shadows are as alive with pigment as are the sunniest hillsides, how many would have allowed a foreground tree to sing so prominently in counterpoint? And in the photograph Mail Pouch Snow, why didn’t the artist simply photoshop out the drainpipe that cuts across the barn’s face?

Congratulations to those artists whose offerings have been selected for the exhibition. Studying your work has brought me great pleasure, and I trust that viewers over the show’s run will be equally rewarded. To those artists whose images were not chosen to go on view, I pray the experience will not dampen your enthusiasm. We all learn by doing, and continuing to submit your work is the best way to measure your progress. And to the ministers behind the Central Pennsylvania of the Arts winter exhibition, particularly Jennifer Shuey and Rick Bryant, I thank you kindly for allowing me to be a part of your celebration, and I salute you for your long-lived efforts to enlighten our communities.

Patrick J. McGrady
Charles V. Hallman Curator
Palmer Museum of Art, Penn State

Exhibition Juror

Patrick J. McGrady is the Charles V. Hallman Senior Curator at Penn State’s Palmer Museum of Art. He oversees the European portions of the museum’s collections and specializes in works on paper with a primary concentration on prints from the fifteenth through the mid-twentieth century. In his twenty-eight years at the Palmer Museum he has curated more than eighty exhibitions in fields ranging from Old Master prints to twentieth-century American painting. Among the exhibitions he is currently organizing are Pennsylvania Scenery, a selection of early landscape views from the Tavern Collection; Ukiyo-e: Images of the Floating World, which features examples from the museum’s collection of Japanese woodblock prints; and a presentation of sixteenth- and seventeenth-century intaglios titled Another Look at the Old Masters.

In addition to his duties with the Palmer Museum, Dr. McGrady has taught courses at Penn State on impressionism and post-impressionism, Wassily Kandinsky and Der Blaue Reiter, connoisseurship, European modernism, and the history of printmaking. He also lectures widely on these topics and others, including fakes and forgeries and stolen art.

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